CANADA: ECONOMIC DEPENDENCE Al\D POLITICAL DISINTEGRATION

Reading Time: 130 minutes

The following is a sketch of Canada’s slide into a relationship of economic political and cultural dependence upon the U.S.A. It seeks to explain the process whereby national entrepreneurship and political unit, have been eroded to a point beyond which lies the disintegration of the Canadian nation-state.

Canada was discovered. explored and developed as part of the French, and later the British mercantile, system. It grew to independence and national road in a brief historical era in which goods, capital and people moved in response to economic forces operating in relatively free, competitive international markets.

Present-day Canada has been described as the world’s richest underdeveloped country. Its regression into a state of extreme economic and political dependence cannot possibly be attributed, as is fashionoble in some quarters, to an unfavourable endowment of resources. Nor con its present lack of independent dynamic be ‘laid of the door of a traditional culture. Here we are forced to seek the explanation of underdevelopment and fragmentation in the institutions and process’s of modern society. We suggest it is to be found in the dynamics of the New Mercantilism of American corporate economy.

 INDEX Page
CANADA AT CROSS ROADS 59
Economic Basis of Free- Choice 62
Choice of Coals 6-t
Sense of History 66
THE RISE OF THE NATION 67
The Old Mercantilism 67
Commercial Entrepreneurial Class 67
The Consolidation of the Nation State 68
REGRESSION TO DEPENDENCE 73
THE NEW MERCANTILISM 82
The Modern Corporation 82
Direct Investment – An American Innovation 85
Manufacturing and Assembling Subsidiaries 95
The Balance of Payments 97
Mature Corporations 105
New Corporations l07
Corporations and Metropolitan Government 109
Hinterland Economy 112
THE HARVEST OF LENGTHENING DEPENDENCE 118
The Mercantilist Nexus 122
Profile of a Rich, Industrialized, Underdeveloped Economy 125

 

CONCLUSION 134
Canada and the United States 136
Ottawa and the Provinces 136
English Canada and Quebec 137
The Definition of National Purpose 139